Dr. Nagler's Tinnitus Corner
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Jim

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 #1 
Dr. Nagler, thank you for your guidance on an earlier post. 
Here is  a question regarding sleep patterns.  I've had tinnitus/hyperacusis for around 4 months.  Thankfully,  I am able to go to sleep fairly easily each night but I always wake up after 3-4 hours to the sound of loud tinnitus "ringing".  It takes me a while for the ringing to fade to a point where I go back to sleep.  My waking hours tinnitus sound is a hiss with some "circadas".  I sleep in a very quiet environment, so I run a sound machine and I also use a CPAP.  Any idea why the consistent waking time?  Thank you.
Dr. Nagler

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 #2 
Jim, I honestly have no idea why you always wake after 3-4 hours. But I’m not so sure that your strategy of waiting for your tinnitus to fade so you can fall back asleep is the best way to go. I mean, people sleep in all sorts of noisy environments. Folks live near railroad tracks, for instance. And they fall asleep just five because the noise of the trains going by is of no consequence to them. I suspect that rather than the loudness of your tinnitus being the driving force, it may well be the consequence of having tinnitus.

You mention that you sleep in a very quiet environment, which is why you (wisely, in my opinion) use a sound machine at your bedside. Prior to tinnitus, I presume you had no need for such a unit. If I may ask, why did you prefer to sleep in a very quiet environment before you developed tinnitus?

Stephen M. Nagler, M.D.

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The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
- Mahatma Gandhi

No bird ever soared in a calm. Adversity is what lifts us.
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David McCullough quoting Wilbur Wright
Jim

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 #3 
My sleep environment prior to the onset of tinnitus was quiet since I live in a rural area.  I also slept very deeply due to the use of the CPAP.  Thank you for your response and I also appreciate your recommendation of Dr. Rushton in an earlier response.  I had a very rewarding first appointment with her.

Dr. Nagler

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 #4 
Jim, I have found that not uncommonly tinnitus sufferers who slept in relative silence before onset of tinnitus hunger for that silence at night more than those who slept in a room with some element of ambient sound prior to onset of tinnitus. The thing of it is ... environmental silence is very stressful for the auditory system. The auditory system constantly seeks sound; hearing environmental sounds is why we have auditory systems in the first place! So in a way these folks (who have long slept in relative silence) hunger for an unhealthy environment at night. Which just serves to add to the frustration. Now there’s a kick in the pants, no?

Stephen M. Nagler, M.D.

__________________

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
- Mahatma Gandhi

No bird ever soared in a calm. Adversity is what lifts us.
-
David McCullough quoting Wilbur Wright
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Dr. Nagler's Tinnitus Corner is provided for education and information only. It is not intended for the purpose of providing medical care and should in no way substitute for appropriate in-person consultations with qualified healthcare professionals. By using this site, participants agree to hold Dr. Nagler and Atlanta Tinnitus Consultants, LLC harmless with respect to any loss, injury, claim, liability, or damage arising from following the postings herein.