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allancurran

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 #1 

Hello Dr Nagler

Today I was sitting at my desk at work, my T was pretty bad today anyway [following two good manageable days previously this week and four days last week].

I was wearing a soft foam earplug in my left ear due to noisy colleagues on my left when I bit into a hard mint with my front teeth.  I have TMJ in my left jaw.  The mint snapped and instantly my tinnitus screeched up a notch and I'm not sure if its came back down or is still there because it was a bad day anyway.

I've had this or something similar happen before, but not as severe,  but why does it happen?  Is it because the jaw joint is so close to the ear and moves like this disturb the mechanism?

Do these types of spike subside? 

Thank you again.

Dr. Nagler

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 #2 
Allan, please tell me what you mean by “up a notch.” To me “up a notch” means a barely noticeable increase. Is that what it means to you?

Thanks -

Stephen M. Nagler, MD.

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No bird ever soared in a calm. Adversity is what lifts us.
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allancurran

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 #3 

It was a very sudden burst of the same noise but louder which seemed to last at least for 10 minutes.  Like someone suddenly turned up the volumne.  It was very noticeable to me and stopped me in my tracks.  The cracking of the hard mint at the same time didnt help either.

I've had this happen [or similar] before, 10 years ago I bit into a sandwich and I felt this 'twang' sensation up by my left jaw joint and instantly a new noise started and was absolutely dreadful. It lasted for about 5 months before it faded.

Dentist X-Ray confirmed a larger gap in my joint, indicating the muscle had slipped over the jaw joint and TMJ, now I can feel the joint pop and grind on the left.

Dr. Nagler

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 #4 
So if I understand you correctly, Allan, when you bit into a hard candy, your tinnitus went "up a notch" for around ten minutes or so - and you are asking me to explain the mechanism. Is that it?

Stephen M. Nagler, M.D.

__________________

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
- Mahatma Gandhi

No bird ever soared in a calm. Adversity is what lifts us.
-
David McCullough quoting Wilbur Wright
allancurran

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 #5 
If you could please? My amateur guess would be it's to do with the jaw joint and the ear being so close and muscle/tendons/ligaments/ nerves etc movement has irritated the fine mechanism of the ear, but I'd rather hear it from a professional, thanks.
Dr. Nagler

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 #6 
Allan, my honest answer to your question is: I really don’t know the precise mechanism whereby your tinnitus gets louder when you bite into a hard candy. And what's more, I really don’t care. Now don’t get me wrong here. I care very much ... about you. But as to the precise mechanism whereby your tinnitus briefly gets louder when you bite into a hard candy? I really don’t care about that at all. To my way of thinking, the more important question is: Why do you care? I mean, what difference does it make? Is the answer somehow going to affect your life in a meaningful way or help you make a decision? If the answer is NO, then it seems to me you may be unwittingly perpetuating your own frustration by unnecessarily devoting time to your tinnitus when you could be devoting time to something more important - like maybe reading a good book ... or perhaps just kicking back and doing nothing! Tinnitus is a big enough problem for you as it is - why complicate matters by devoting any more time to it than is absolutely necessary??!!

Stephen M. Nagler, M.D.
Atlanta Tinnitus Consultants, LLC

__________________

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
- Mahatma Gandhi

No bird ever soared in a calm. Adversity is what lifts us.
-
David McCullough quoting Wilbur Wright
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Dr. Nagler's Tinnitus Corner is provided for education and information only. It is not intended for the purpose of providing medical care and should in no way substitute for appropriate in-person consultations with qualified healthcare professionals. By using this site, participants agree to hold Dr. Nagler and Atlanta Tinnitus Consultants, LLC harmless with respect to any loss, injury, claim, liability, or damage arising from following the postings herein.